Biology

Difference between Nucleotide and Nucleoside

They are building blocks of nucleic acids.  Nucleotide and nucleoside form key structural elements of genetic material. Both are the basic components of DNA and RNA, which are vital molecules in all living cells since they encode all the information necessary for the survival, growth, and reproduction of cells. While both are part of the genetic material, and the basic Difference between Nucleotide and Nucleoside is that nucleotide is a compound that is formed by the union of a nitrogenous base, pentose sugar, and phosphate. On the other hand, a nucleoside is a compound that is formed by the union of a nitrogenous base with a pentose sugar.

Overview

A nucleotide is a compound produces before RNA and DNA, while the nucleoside occurs before the nucleotide itself. Both are building blocks of nucleic acid, as nucleotides consist of the same components such as a nitrogenous base, sugar, and a phosphate group. Nucleosides contain only sugar and a base whereas Nucleotides contain sugar, base, and a phosphate group as well.

Difference between Nucleotide and Nucleoside In Tabular Form

Nucleotide

Nucleoside

The compound is formed by the combination of a nitrogenous base, pentose sugar, and phosphate. The compound is formed by a union of nitrogenous bases with pentose sugar.
It is formed through the phosphorylation of nucleosides. It is also a unit of nucleotide.
Acidic. Basic in nature.
The malfunctioning nucleotide is one of the major reasons behind cancer. They are used for medicinal purposes, mostly as anti-cancer agents and against various viruses.
Sugar + Base + Phosphate results in the formation of nucleotides. Sugar + Base form nucleosides.
There are some common examples of Nucleotide are listed below:

  • Adenosine
  • cytidine
  • guanosine
  • Uridine
  • Thymidine
  • Inosine, etc.

In nucleotides, the phosphate groups have occurred.

There are some common examples of Nucleosides are listed below:

  • Adenosine
  • Cytidine
  • Guanosine
  • Uridine
  • Thymidine,
  • Inosine

There is no presence of phosphate groups.

Nucleotide

A nucleotide is a member of a class of organic compounds in which the molecular structure comprises a nitrogen-containing unit (base) attached to a sugar and a phosphate group.

Nucleotide Function

They are of great importance to living organisms, while they are the building blocks of nucleic acids, the substances that control all inherited characteristics.

Nucleotide Sequence

In the two families of nucleic acids, RNA and DNA, the nucleotide sequence in DNA or RNA encode the structure of proteins synthesized in the cell. ATP (Adenosine Nucleotide Triphosphate) provides the driving force for many metabolic processes. Different nucleotides are coenzymes; while they work with enzymes to speed up (catalyze) biochemical reactions.

See Also:

Nucleotide Examples:

There are some common examples of Nucleotide are listed below:

  • Adenosine
  • cytidine
  • guanosine
  • Uridine
  • Thymidine
  • Inosine, etc.

The phosphate groups have occurred in nucleotides.

Nucleoside

A nucleoside is a basic structural subunit of nucleic acids, the components that control the inheritance of all living cells that possess a sugar molecule attached to a nitrogen-containing organic ring compound. In some important nucleosides, the sugar is ribose, and the nitrogen-containing compound is a pyrimidine (cytosine, thymine, or uracil) or a purine (adenine or guanine).

Nucleoside Structure

Nucleosides are generally obtained by the chemical or enzymatic decomposition of nucleic acids. Experiments show that the size of the ring of atoms in sugar molecules, and the point of attachment between the two components.

Nucleoside Functions

  • The basic function of nucleotides is related to signaling molecules and as precursors to nucleotides needed for RNA & DNA synthesis.
  • Nucleosides also have functions related to cell signaling, metabolism, and enzyme reactions.
  • They can play vital roles outside of genetic information storage, as messengers and energy-moving molecules.

Nucleoside Examples:

There are some common examples of Nucleosides are listed below:

  • Adenosine
  • Cytidine
  • Guanosine
  • Uridine
  • Thymidine,
  • Inosine

There is no presence of phosphate groups.

Other Biology Differences

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