Chemistry

Difference Between Vaporization and Evaporation

vaporization is the process of conversion of a solid or a liquid into a gaseous state at its boiling point. while evaporation is a process by which water changes from a liquid to a gas or vapor at a temperature below its boiling point. the basic Difference Between Vaporization and Evaporation is that vaporization takes place only at a fixed temperature i.e. at its boiling point and temperature during vaporization does not change. on the other hand, evaporation is a process that takes place at all temperatures and temperature may change during evaporation.

Difference Between Vaporization and Evaporation in tabular Form

Vaporization Evaporation
it is a transitional phase of a compound/element that occurs during the boiling or sublimation process. it is only a type of vaporization except for a process that occurs at below boiling point temperatures.
it can change the state of matter i.e. from solid to liquid and liquid to gas etc. it can change the state of the matter directly from liquid to gas.
it is referred to as a very fast process and always required a lesser amount of energy to take place. on contrary, it is referred to as a slow process and always required a higher amount of energy to increase the tendency of molecules to convert into vapors phase.
in this process all the water change into a gaseous state. in this process, only water from the upper surface turned into a gaseous state.
in vaporization, when liquids are boils, molecules come from the bottom surface to the top. in evaporation, molecules only from the top surface convert into gas.
does not depend on external factors. external factors like surface area, temperature, humidity, and wind speed are highly dependent on this phenomenon/process.
known as a bulk phenomenon that takes place at the entire mass of the liquid. this is called a surface phenomenon that only occurs at the toper surface of the liquid.

What is Vaporization?

It is the conversion of the liquid or solid phase into the gaseous or vapor phase. It is a transitional phase of a compound/element that occurs during the boiling or sublimation process. The temperature between the molecules increases due to the kinetic energy of the molecules.

The rise in the kinetic energy is due to the force of attraction between the molecules decreases. The formation of vapor bubbles within a liquid is called boiling of vaporization. while sublimation is a process in which a solid convert directly into a vapor state.

In vaporization, the amount of heat must be supplied to a solid or liquid. Vaporization may come from the system itself if the surroundings do not supply enough heat as a reduction in temperature. the atoms of liquids are held to each other by cohesive forces.

These forces separate the atoms or molecules from the vapor. the vaporization heat is a direct measure of cohesive forces.

Factors Affecting The Rate of Vaporization

  • Intermolecular Forces
  • The concentration of an evaporating material
  • Amount of substance in the liquid that has been dissolved
  • Pressure
  • Surface Area
  • Temperature

What is Evaporation?

Evaporation is a process in which atoms or molecules undergo a spontaneous transition from the liquid to the gas phase which occurs at a given temperature below the boiling point. It is the opposite of condensation. it can change the state of the matter directly from liquid to gas.

On contrary, it is referred to as a slow process and always required a higher amount of energy to increase the tendency of molecules to convert into vapors phase. in this process, only water from the upper surface turned into a gaseous state.

Molecules in a liquid must have enough kinetic energy to escape the interface. The average kinetic energy of the remaining molecules is lowered when molecules do escape from the surface of the water. The evaporation of water into vapors causes the drying of damp clothes is an example of evaporation.

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